James Clerk Maxwell

James Clerk Maxwell

The James Clerk Maxwell Statue

Our modern technological society, from the computer to telecommunications, rests firmly on the foundations established by Maxwell. It was Maxwell’s emphasis on the basic role of fields of force that led Einstein to his general theory of relativity and the modern understanding of gravity. For a scientist of Maxwell’s stature, there are few memorials to him. In 2006, the 175th anniversary of his birth raised his profile in his home city and the RSE, of which Maxwell had been a Fellow, initiated plans for a statue of him.

A commemorative book listing all those who generously donated to the project has now been published. Click here to view the Book of Donors.

 

The James Clerk Maxwell Book

A stunning 130 page book, published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh to commemorate the achievements and legacy of James Clerk Maxwell is available to purchase.

The James Clerk Maxwell Room

Directly off the main entrance hall of the RSE, this traditional room with cornicing and period marble fireplace is dedicated to James Clerk Maxwell.  Within this room there is a cabinet containing original papers by Maxwell. A new addition to the room is a hologram of the James Clerk Maxwell Statue (by Alexander Stoddart) that was erected at the east end of George Street in November 2008.

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'From Maxwell to Higgs' Exhibition

The RSE, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh’s School of Physics and Astronomy, has created an exhibition that celebrates the links between James Clerk Maxwell and Peter Higgs, and the recent discovery at CERN. ‘From Maxwell to Higgs’ emphasises the crucial role Peter Higgs has played, whilst also highlighting the historic discoveries and theories that have influenced current thinking about the existence of such a particle. The exhibition was opened by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh on 26 September 2012.

Both the James Clerk Maxwell Room and the From Maxwell to Higgs exhibition are available for public view, provided the rooms are not in use by the RSE Conference Centre.

 

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